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Lastly interview with...
Tina Rath

Tina Rath gained her doctorate from London University with a thesis on The Vampire in Popular Fiction. She has lectured on vampires for various universities, and also written short vampire fiction. She is currently working as an actress and model and her appearances have included one as a piece of conceptual art at the South London Gallery, and spending seven hours in a coffin in a window at Tower Records in central London. She lives in London with her husband, Tony, who has also written vampire stories, and several cats, who have, so far, written nothing. Neither she nor Tony believe in vampires but the cats are ambivalent on the subject.
What is the last thing you would do if you had 5 minutes to live?
Pray.
What is the last thing you would do if you came face to face with a real vampire?
Say thank you for the interview.
What is the last thing you think of before you turn out the light?
Did I set the alarm... Did I REALLY set the alarm???
What was the last book you read?
The Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett (yes, I know it’s a children’s book - sad, yes).
What was the last horror film you watched?
Murnau's Faust.
When was the last time you were scared?
This morning.
Who is the last person you would want to meet in a dark alley?
I dare not say.
What would you like your last words to be?
Such beautiful music!
Article taken from Bite me Magazine 13
Other articles taken from Bite me Magazine...
Dracula Unearthed
The Mother Of All Cemeteries
Interview with the Gothic Cryptozoologist
Gothic Goddess Jane Goldman
LAST BITES
Last Words
Here lies the body of Mary Ann Lowder, She burst while drinking a seidleitz powder,
Called from this world to her heavenly rest, She should have waited ‘till it effervesced. New Jersey 1798


Last Laugh
Q: How many vampires does it take to change a light bulb?
A: We’ll never know, vampires can see in the dark.


Last Exit
A nineteenth century man was revived by the sound of his favourite hymn being played at his own funeral. Startled mourners heard the voice of the prematurely buried man join in the singing.
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